Flying Creatures

Flying Creatures

Have you ever noticed that more often we see the birds around us – and all of them are beautiful and wonderful by definition – the more they become invisible to us. We take for granted the beauty of our planet and because we see birds so often, we see them less and less. By my photographs of birds I try to express certain things that happen in this reincarnation of my soul in this world, I mean, good part of it and the part I’m not happy with, the sad part.

In England, United Kingdom, the word birds can signify something else than the meaning here, namely the warm-blooded vertebrates with feathers, like the flamingo species. Ornithology is the science that studies these animals. Perhaps their most striking feature – their ability to fly – rests on them having hollow bones and a rumored incapacity to get fat.

Birds are predominant in mythology and symbolism, such at the white dove signifying peace. Similarly, many mythical creatures are winged, often formed by morphing eagles’, bats’ and other animals’ representations. In fantasy and Medieval literature, winged dragons are curiously reminiscent of dinosaurs, with a mix of pterosaurs or pterodactyls, likewise winged, but reptilian in nature. Griffins have an eagle’s head and a lion’s body. Felines have similarly been a favored subject of mythology, with the Sphinx a remnant of Ancient times with the head of a woman and the body of a lion, the ruins still seen in contemporary Egypt. Crows and ravens are most likely associated with Gothic literature. Horror films have also showcased birds, such as Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds.


Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterest